QuickLit – March 2017

Linking up to Modern Mrs. Darcy for her monthly QuickLit post, where we share “short and sweet reviews of what we’ve been reading lately”. I’ll share everything I’ve read over the previous month here at the end of each month, in the order I finished reading them. I read 21 books in March, but a few of them were 200 pages or less, which is what led to such big numbers this month. Here’s the rundown!title image


01 The OneThe One by Kiera Cass

More drama for America and Maxon. Good stuff in this one, though! And even though there are more books after this one, it feels like a good wrap up spot.
I’ve borrowed #4 but am taking a break for the next in the Red Queen series. As I dive back into that one, it seems they have many similarities, so I will say that if you enjoyed the one you might enjoy the other, although The Selection series is definitely a bit more “fluffy”.


02 Glass SwordGlass Sword by Victoria Aveyard

Oof, I didn’t enjoy this one nearly as much as the first one the series. It felt like endless plans for battles, and then the battles themselves, and then hating each other and adoring each other. The constant mood swings made me feel manic-depressive.


03 Study in CharlotteA Study in Charlotte by Brittany Cavallaro

Kind of felt a bit like this one was trying too hard to be witty. This story centers on the modern day descendants of Holmes and Watson at boarding school. They are equally maddening and endearing, like their predecessors. Overall, this retelling was fun and interesting enough, I’m just not sure it scratched the itch I was expecting it to satisfy.


04 The HeirThe Heir by Kiera Cass

I almost abandoned this one as soon as I realized what the premise was. But I persevered, because these books mostly feel like candy to me: completely devoid of nutritional content, but tasty nonetheless! I don’t want to ruin anything in the previous books, so I’ll say that this one felt a bit like a rerun, but I still enjoyed it enough to finish it, and still requested the next one from the library. I would have been equally pleased with the series ending on book 3, though, so you may want to consider that before continuing on?


05 Just MercyJust Mercy by Bryan Stevenson

This book is eye opening and heart breaking. Tt will remove the scales from your eyes in regard to prison sentences, the death penalty, institutional racism, and the cycle of poverty. I found myself alternately crying, shaking my head in disbelief, shuddering in anger, and dumbstruck. Bryan Stevenson brings his decades of law experience and leadership of the Equal Justice Initiative to bear in this moving, non-fiction memoir. It is not to be missed.


06 KindredKindred by Octavia Butler

Dang, this was crazy. Dana is a black writer in 1976 America who unwillingly travels through space and time back to a plantation in pre-Civil War America. The stark contrast in society, personhood, and value are, of course, hard to acclimate to. The premise behind this book feels kind of similar to Outlander, but with the additional insanity of race relations and slavery thrown in the mix. Highly recommended, even if it’s mostly so I have friends to talk to about this one!


07 Range of MotionRange of Motion by Elizabeth Berg

One of my favorite internet friends, Sasha of Pathologically Literate, knew I would love this one and she was right. It is such a beautiful reflection on love and life and friendship and loss and grief and joy. I borrowed it from the library but found myself really wanting to dog-ear pages and underline quotes and read paragraphs again and again. Berg is a stunning writer and I’m looking forward to finding a few more of her books to dive into. Thanks, Sasha!


08 Behind Her EyesBehind Her Eyes by Sarah Pinborough

Hhhuuuuhhhh??? @$#$&%@@=<:; <— Me being a spazz after finishing this crazy-ass book. This book is a total mind trip. It’ll mess with you in the best way and you’ll have to figure out the end before you go to sleep. Sarah Pinborough kept me guessing all the way to the end. And even then, I felt like I needed to start at the beginning and re-read with the twist in mind. There’s a reason the hashtag for this one is #wtfthatending.


09 Cold TangerinesCold Tangerines by Shauna Niequist

I love Shauna Niequist. I really do. But this isn’t my favorite thing of hers. She has really come into her own over the past few years, so this book from 10 years ago feels a bit underdeveloped and more like a collection of blog posts. I still love her, but would recommend choosing something else to read by her if you’re just getting on the Niequist train, like Bread and Wine, one of my favorite books of 2013, or her newest book, Present Over Perfect.


10 TriggersTriggers by Amber Lia and Wendy Speak

After slowly working through this book together over the past six months, my bestie Krysta and I finally finished up our Triggers study today!!! We were fueled by coffee, friendship, and prayer. Are we perfect mamas now? Not a chance. Do we still get “triggered” to anger by the things our children do? Absolutely. But we are better able to identify and manage those triggers in order to build happier, healthier relationships with our boys, and we are better for it. I’d highly recommend picking up a copy to ALL parents and would happily meet with local moms who want to discuss what we’ve learned!


11 The House GirlThe House Girl by Tara Conklin

This book started out slow for me, but I appreciated how well it came together. Lina is a young attorney trying to make her way up to partner, and she is tasked with finding a plaintiff in a reparations case. Josephine is the house girl of a wealthy southern plantation owner, and has a close relationship with the mistress of the house, but dreams of freedom. I listened to the audiobook and constantly wished they had used at least 2 narrators. I do think that would have enhanced the experience a bit! But the story of Lina and Josephine really captured me by the end.


12 Life-Changing Magic of Not GivingThe Life-Changing Magic of Not Giving a F*ck by Sarah Knight

This book is loosely based on The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up, but instead, focuses on “tidying” your mental/emotional/social “barn”. I did indeed laugh out loud a few times and then find it super self-serving. Not like she was trying to snag the Christian crowd with this title, but the book is essentially about hedonism: “embrace what you love and f*ck the rest”


13 WaywardWayward by Blake Crouch

Unlike my feelings about most sequels, this one really held my interest. I also appreciated that it wasn’t as graphically violent as the first book in the series. I thought I figured out where the end was going and decided it was probably going to ruin the series for me, but then the twist kept me going and now I can’t wait for number 3!


14 Essential EnneagramThe Essential Enneagram by David Daniels

All that this book did for me was confirm that I’m a 2. I don’t feel like I learned much of anything about myself as it was SO bare bones regarding each type. I’m hoping that the otter enneagram books I have will help me dive deeper into what my type really means, how I interact with others (I believe my husband to be a 3), and help me to learn more about the enneagram and its modern applications. I have to assume there are better options out there for all of this, so don’t waste your time or money on this cursory overview.


15 Lincoln in the BardoLincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders

I loved the “play” aspect of this with so many actors and voices portraying the audiobook version. BUT I do recommend at least glancing through a paper copy if you’re going to listen to the audio version, or else you’ll be super confused about what’s going on! The plot itself is interesting and funny and smart. I’ve never read anything else by Saunders, so I’m not sure if this is representative of his work or not, but I do recommend this one.


16 WonderThe Wonder by Emma Donaghue

I felt compelled to finish this one, but not because it was so plot- or character-driven that I couldn’t stop, but rather because I paid good money for this book and it sat there for months taunting me with its unfinished-ness while I worked through SO many great library books!

The story of Lib and the miraculous Anna who doesn’t eat is part mystery, part drama, part wrestling with God. It would be a great premise for a shorter story, but trying to turn 7 chapters into almost 300 pages was a recipe for dull moments. I’m sure you have something more interesting in your stacks to be read, so I’ll recommend a pass on this one.


17 Exit Pursued by a BearExit, Pursued by a Bear by E.K. Johnston

This was a fantastic story about high school senior Hermione, who suffers a tragic sexual assault at cheer camp, and then rises above. But she can’t do it alone, and her parents, best friend, coach, team, and psychiatrist rally around her to raise her up. It’s like a fictionalized lesson in how to deal with the tough shit that teenagers and going adults get confronted with all the time but aren’t equipped to handle. Great story, well written, and a fast read.


18 Marriage lieThe Marriage Lie by Kimberly Belle

I liked this one overall, but felt like the beginning was too drawn out and the end was too hasty and glossed over. Of course it’s about lie upon lie upon lie, thus: the marriage lie. I feel like I was expecting another twist toward the end that never came and the other ones were predictable enough that I wasn’t shocked. Definitely a decent story, I just feel like there are others I’d recommend first if you’re looking for a domestic thriller.


19 At Home in the WorldAt Home in the World by Tsh Oxenreider

I absolutely adore this travel memoir from Tsh Oxenreider. I’m a longtime fan of her blog, The Art of Simple, and her podcast, The Simple Show, and this book is like a longform version of both. Tsh’s voice is clear, lyrical, and honest. She absolutely brings her #WorldWideOx travels to life in these pages, and you’ll find yourself both eager for adventure and grateful for home, exactly as she intended. You’ll enjoy your own prefect tension between wanderlust and cozy hominess, both/and. You’ll want to scoop up your kids and take them to see where you met your spouse, and watch their eyes light up at a great wonder of the world or UNESCO world heritage site, and see them make friends everywhere in the world despite the lack of a common language or culture. I can’t wait to read this book again and to give it to friends to read for the first time. And I’ll be honest and say I found myself tearing up on more than one occasion while reading.

Perfect gift for the parents that gave you your own wanderlust, the recent graduate, the empty nesters debating their next adventure, and the mom sitting next to you at school pickup every afternoon.

*I received an advance copy from the publisher in exchange for an honest review*… but I also bought a hard copy for myself with my own cash-money!


20 Enneagram Made EasyThe Enneagram Made Easy by Renee Baron and Elizabeth Wagele

I thought this was an excellent, concise, readable treatment of the Enneagram. The drawings add levity and sass to what could otherwise be a very dry subject, as noted in my other book review on this topic this month. Of the two, I’d definitely recommend this short version if you’re still wondering if you’ve pinpointed your type correctly. You’re bound to feel like the descriptors of one of them just fit.


21 AmericanahAmericanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

First, I listened to this one on audio and found the narration so lovely. I’m not sure if the narrator IS Nigerian, but her precise accents for the Nigerian, British, and American characters really brought this novel to life for me. I thought she did a wonderful job.

The novel itself is a convicting sweeping story that fictionalizes the horrors and trials and systematized racism faced by American and non-American Blacks in 21st century America. The part that makes this so compelling is that the main character is the outsider in more than one sense. She doesn’t JUST face the racism inherent in our white-centric culture, she sees it from the outside, so she is more able to name it and see the differences from her home country of Nigeria. The entire book is just so well put together. Highly recommended.


Happy reading, friends! Hope you found something here that belongs on your own TBR list. Have a suggestion for mine? Leave it in the comments!

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5 thoughts on “QuickLit – March 2017

  1. Thanks for the shout-out, Book Bestie!!

    Awesome month of reading, my friend. 21 books! Whew!! You read SO many good ones, too!! So happy you loved Range of Motion, and that you went for Kindred as well. It was actually written in 1979, so Butler beat Gabladon to the punch with the time-traveling premise by a long shot… 😉 Exit, Pursued by a Bear is one of my faves of the year already – loved it so much!! I’m leading the Book Club discussion at the end of the month, so be prepared. Thanks again for sharing your bookish exploits and thoughts with us!! ❤

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  2. Wow, 21 books!! Sounds like a pretty amazing reading month. I just finished reading Americanah this morning and loved it so much. I think Adichie is just incredible. I’ve also got a copy of Lincoln in the Bardo at home and I’m really excited to read it. Thanks for sharing! 🙂

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  3. I have At Home in the World on my TBR and excited for my library copy to come in! Totally agree on the Selection series, really should have ended after book #3. The later ones got a lot of eye rolls from me (but I still read them…)

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  4. I am awaiting my copy of At Home In The World to come in the mail tomorrow! I enjoyed The Wonder overall but it definitely had some parts that kept dragging. It could have been shortened atleast 50-75pgs

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