QuickLit – November 2016

Linking up to Modern Mrs. Darcy for her monthly QuickLit post, where we share “short and sweet reviews of what we’ve been reading lately”. I’ll share everything I’ve read over the previous month here at the end of each month, in the order I finished reading them. I read 12 books this month! That’s a great reading month for me!


01-behind-closed-doorsBehind Closed Doors by B.A. Paris

Currently $2.99 on Kindle!

This book was really disturbing. the farther I got into it the faster I had to read because it was freaking me out. It’s been called “the psychological thriller you won’t be able to put down” and that’s exactly what it was for me. Grace and Jack Angel’s marriage looks totally perfect from the outside, but….. ugggghhh. Totally terrified me in the best way. all kinds of trigger warnings for this book but if you like psychological thrillers, definitely pick it up!


02-small-great-thingsSmall Great Things by Jodi Picoult

This has unseated The Storyteller as absolutely my favorite of Picoult’s books thus far. It can be adequately summed up by the author’s note at the end. She challenged herself and all of her white readers by writing as a black woman and a white supremacist man. I was challenged and moved and cried (as per usual with her books). Systematic racism is real and horrifying and unseen by so many of us who have lived out our lives in white privilege. I cannot recommend this book highly enough.


03-the-dispatcherThe Dispatcher by John Scalzi

I picked up this audio novella when it was on sale for free on day, never having read any of Scalzi’s work. I was honestly hooked by Zachary Quinto’s voice (Spock and Skylar!). His chilling voice is perfect for this little Sci fi romp into a world where murder is virtually ineffective: 999/1000 times you come back to life, but if you are murdered. and people use that to their advantage with dispatchers, who kill you if you are about to die so that you can come back. Super interesting premise and a quick “read” (only as an audiobook). I recommend it


04-hillbilly-elegyHillbilly Elegy by J.D. Vance

I heard this recommended multiple times from varying sources, especially for those who were dying to understand Trump’s rise in popularity with the rust belt. I finished it the night before Election Day and found it supremely interesting. Vance’s upbringing and escape of the hillbilly culture into the middle class were fantastic. For those that are dying to understand the unseen part of America that helped vote Trump into the presidency, I cannot recommend this highly enough.


05-when-breath-becomes-airWhen Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi

Paul Kalanithi is a neurosurgeon who considered a career in creative writing. Those two very disparate paths led to this amazing memoir detailing his diagnosis of cancer and the subsequent fight for his life. Paul’s writing is beautiful and poignant. He so faithfully captures both the doctor and patient side of care. As with everyone else who read this novel and recommended it, the afterword by his wife left me weeping on the floor. So, yes, cry-fest warning on this one!


06-arrowoodArrowood by Laura McHugh

I couldn’t put down this Gothic mystery about the disappearance of Arden Arrowood’s twin baby sisters when she was a young girl. Arden returns to her family’s home in Iowa after the death of her father and finds herself confronted by the past. Her family moved away from the home shortly after the disappearance of her sisters, with Arden as the sole witness. Definitely got my heart pounding a few times and had me guessing in the wrong direction a few times. Overall, very readable and entertaining. I look forward to picking up her previous novel, The Weight of Blood, as well.


 

07-portrait-of-emily-price

A Portrait of Emily Price by Katherine Reay

Be sure you check out my interview with Katherine, the first author I had on my site! I loved this book and feel like we’re really starting to see Reay’s evolution as a writer. She is really coming into her own, writing stories that she is putting her whole self into. I do kind of feel like there are two stories in this one though, and with a little more length on each, it could have been two novels instead. there’s just that much good stuff here. Emily and Ben are your favorite romantic comedy couple in paper form. ❤❤❤


08-light-of-the-worldThe Light of the World by Elizabeth Alexander

Elizabeth Alexander primarily writes poetry, and that is achingly obvious in this memoir about the loss of her husband unexpectedly at age 50. although his death is the pivot point, this book is more about their life together, the fallout/healing after his death, and his family, more so than the event itself. I thought it was beautifully written. However, I read two books about the loss of a husband in a single week and it’s a bit too much. IMPORTANT NOTE: I AM NOT FACING THE LOSS OF MY HUSBAND, THEY JUST HAPPENED TO BOTH COME UP AT THE LIBRARY AT ONCE!


09-i-hate-everyone-except-youI Hate Everyone, Except You by Clinton Kelly

This was like reading a book written by my bestie. I’ve been a “fruit fly” (the tender and ridiculous name for those girls that hang around gay boys) for the majority of my life and this book feels like the musings of a more famous version of my dear gay boys. You know Clinton Kelly from What Not to Wear and/or The Chew. Kelly doesn’t pull any punches, except for revealing the intimate details of his marriage. All the rest is fair, and fairly hilarious, game. This one comes out in January. I received an advance copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.


12-victoriaVictoria by Daisy Goodwin

This historical novel details only the first year or two of the reign of Queen Victoria of England. It is deftly written, pulling you into a story that is more than a century old as though it dealt with current events. I enjoyed the characters but found young Victoria petulant, which I’m sure the author intended. definitely recommended for fans of historical fiction and/or fans of the royals (The Royal We, Downton Abbey, etc). I received an advanced copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.


10-tell-me-three-thingsTell Me Three Things by Julie Buxbaum

This is great YA lit. Is smart and funny and endearing without being inane, or sob-fest-worthy. High school drama, yes, but not overly dramatic. Mostly about growing up and first love, and we can all get behind that!

Jessie is a transplant to a new school and receives an email after her first day there from Somebody Nobody, who offers to be her “spirit guide” through the wild halls of their high school. Such a fun premise. Think You’ve Got Mail.


11-homegoing Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi

This novel contains a story of a single family that spans 6 or 7 generations and multiple continents. From 18th century Africa to modern day America, we follow an African family, beginning with the two daughters of Maame. The vignettes that give us glimpses of each generation are wonderfully written and so well put together. It’s like a shallow dive into African culture, slavery, the American Civil War, Jim Crow, and current BLM movements. Gently leading the reader to see from all points of view (or at least one different from your own).

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4 thoughts on “QuickLit – November 2016

  1. What a stack!! I loved your three favorites and absolutely adored TELL ME THREE THINGS. I have to say that this is the first time I have heard of being a “fruit fly,” and proudly admit that I am one 😉 Great reviews!!

    Like

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